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GTE Blog

Our blogs highlight work of many different campuses internationalizing their teacher education programs. Find strategies, ideas, and innovative approaches to explore more deeply. Please feel free to add your comments to the blogs and share your stories with your peers.
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Views and Voices in Our World: A Global Sense of Space in Teacher Education

September 18, 2013 | 9:28 am
You think you know a place, and then you are asked to look at it differently. This was the premise behind asking my students – Master’s of Education students in the Social Studies and Global Education program at The Ohio State University – to take on the role of Agents for Global Awareness during a summer course in July.  I asked students to traverse the University District on North High Street – the name of the area the in which the University is located – to consider the question:  What sites, places, and/or people could you use to teach about global interconnectedness?  They used their smartphone cameras to capture images, short videos, and brief interviews with people on the street to answer the question.  The class discussion that followed provided opportunity for reflection, and revealed that the activity prompted my teacher candidates to think critically about space and global interconnectedness.Most of the class members completed their undergraduate studies at OSU.  Despite... read more
Posted by: Jason Harshman
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The World is a Classroom

September 12, 2013 | 9:23 am
Students in America do not live in isolation.  Internationalizing American curriculum is important because it enables our students to engage, compete, and develop with the rest of the world.  Location and nationality should not limit our students’ opportunities to learn and understand.  For pre-service teachers and K-12 students, the best classroom in the world is the world itself.  Incorporating international perspectives into American curriculum is the best way to ensure our students grow up with an understanding of the world that includes new cultural perspectives.  It is important to target educators like myself who are preparing to become teachers to ensure that what they teach reflects the broader world community.  When pre-service teachers are able to experience international perspectives firsthand, they develop a more comprehensive skill set and broader experiences to bring into the classroom.  This translates into a more globalized learning experience for their students who... read more
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It Starts With Students: Critical Self-Reflection for a Globally Connected Approach to Teacher Education

September 9, 2013 | 9:53 am
Youths offer a critical lens through which we can learn a great deal about the local impacts of global systems as well as power structures related to poverty, environmental injustice, and global media. I discovered this in my research as a doctoral student studying Global Education at the Ohio State University.   My dissertation titled – “Our World Around the Corner: How Youths Experience Space and Global Interconnectedness” – examines how youths describe and conceptualize where they live and the extent they believe these places are affected by or connected to larger global systems. This project provides opportunity for youths to articulate how they conceptualize global issues as being interconnected with their neighborhoods and if their ideas regarding place relate to their identity as global citizens.  I have found that when youths are provided opportunity to discuss their experiences, new meanings and more critical understandings are constructed on how global systems affect where... read more
Posted by: Jason Harshman
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Back to School: Reflections on Learning Theory for Global Competence and International Socialization

September 3, 2013 | 4:36 pm
As schools across the country go back into session, it inspired me to consider why I decided to go “back-to-school.” I am currently a Ph.D. student who returned to school after over a decade of professional experience to study International Education Policy at the University of Maryland, College Park. On the morning of September 11, 2001, as I was heading out the door for work, I caught the news coverage of the first plane hitting the World Trade Center on Good Morning America. A former resident of the tri-state area, I assumed – like many others at first – that it was a plane off course from one of the local airports. In the brief time it took me to drive to my job as a Study Abroad Coordinator at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, planes hit the second Tower and the Pentagon.Shortly after the second airplane hit the World Trade Center, an international student came into the international education office absolutely distraught. One of the American students in his residence hall... read more
Posted by: Lisa Swayhoover
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Disappointingly Rare in Schools of Education

August 23, 2013 | 9:44 am
This was oringially published on Education Week's Global Learning blog.International students are beneficial to Americans.One benefit is economic. During the 2011-2012 academic year, international students contributed $21.8 billion dollars to the U.S. economy, mostly in the form of tuition and living expenses according to an annual tool that measures the economic impact of international students published by NAFSA: Association of International Educators. Every seven international students enrolled that year created three jobs in the United States.A recent study offers strong evidence that international students also bring social benefits. Researchers surveyed 2,000 Americans five, 10, and 20 years after graduation from U.S.-based institutions. Those who interacted with international students in college—when compared to peers who did not have those interactions—reported greater openness to perspectives and greater willingness to challenge their beliefs. The more prolonged the... read more
Posted by: Caitlin Haugen
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Addressing Disconnects in Perceptions of 21st Century Skills: Developing Global Competency in Field Practitioners Through Curricular Development

July 30, 2013 | 11:10 am
Internationalization of teacher education is a critical approach to preparing today’s students as tomorrow’s stewards. Our children today need to be prepared as future adults to act on increasingly complex global impacts that may have seemed unimaginable only a few decades ago. Global impacts include, but are not limited to, population growth, immigration trends, environmental concerns, conflict, terrorism, girls education, persistence of poverty, energy consumption, food shortage, and international divides of affluence and poverty. Our problems of today and tomorrow require us to carefully consider global dimensions as we serve our local communities.One of the main challenges to internationalizing teacher education seems to be the juxtaposition between serving local and serving global. That is, teacher education serves local communities in producing an educated and productive workforce with the reality that we live in an interdependent (and co-dependent) global reality. This fusion... read more
Posted by: Melanie Agnew
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To See Life, See the World:Reflections on 40 Years of Intercultural Student Teaching Through the Cultural Immersion Projects at Indiana University

June 26, 2013 | 7:06 pm
On a recent flight between Greece and Rome, I read a snippet in Alitalia’s inflight magazine, Ulisse, about an exhibit in Rome of a collection of the most famous photographs from Life magazine.  “To See Life, See the World,” the headline of the snippet announced, drawing on the words of Henry Luce, whose emphasis on photojournalism had transformed the magazine to what most of us remember of it today.  To see life, see the world ... as it often does, my mind sprang to my students – teacher education majors who complete a portion of their student teaching abroad, seeing the world, experiencing life, and undergoing their own personal and professional transformations as a result. I was on my way home from Thessaloniki, a potential new placement site for my program, the Cultural Immersion Projects, offered through the School of Education at Indiana University.  It was a busy week of meetings with my new in-country collaborator and his colleagues, visits to nearly a dozen local schools... read more
Posted by: Laura Stachowski
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International Experiences Benefit Pre-Service Teachers

June 6, 2013 | 11:45 am
This was oringially published on Education Week's Global Learning blog.International experiences are extremely beneficial to future educators. Fred Carter, Director of Teacher Services at Western Kentucky University (WKU), illustrates why.In the spring of 2009, two groups of students graduated from WKU's teacher certification program—those who had participated in an international student teaching program and those who had not. Twenty percent of graduates in the latter group were employed as teachers that fall. And the graduates with experience abroad? Fully 100% of them were employed in teaching positions.Carter reported this eye-opening finding at NAFSA's Colloquium on Internationalizing Teacher Education—one of several specialized colloquia that focuses on internationalizing curricula in key disciplines. This year's colloquium for teacher educators convened last week, and explored international experiential learning opportunities for pre-service teachers, such as student teaching... read more
Posted by: Caitlin Haugen
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Developing Informed and Engaged Students for a Globally Connected World: A Study of IB Teachers in 43 Nations

May 2, 2013 | 2:58 pm
When teachers aim to develop students who will grow up to be citizens of the world, what exactly do they do?  This question has been on my mind for many years, and I have studied it within several nations since 1985.  Recently I worked with the International Baccalaureate (IB) in The Hague to examine what teachers are thinking and doing across the world in the IB Diploma Programme (secondary school level). Through online focus groups, I and my research assistants Tami Augustine, Jason Harshman, Carolyn Kaplan, and Melinda McClimans led a series of two week long threaded discussions in English and Spanish with 126 IB teachers. The online discussions addressed these questions: what does it means to be a global citizen? What are you doing day to day to prepare your students to think and act as citizens of the world?* Today I will share some of the overall findings and then focus on one that the teachers identified as foundational yet it rarely is discussed in the global education... read more
Posted by: Merry Merryfield
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Internationalizing Colleges of Education

April 27, 2013 | 12:00 am
This story originally appeared on Education Week's Global Learning blog.Colleges of education in the United States are slow to respond to internationalization efforts, and this is reflected in the lack of global competency skills in our students.University administrators in the United States are increasingly identifying internationalization as key a component in their strategic plans, and they are working to develop international programs and offices at their institutions to support these goals. They are beginning to recognize that globally competent graduates are more marketable in today's workforce. Institutions are working to provide more study abroad and exchange opportunities, develop partnerships with institutions overseas, bring international students to their campuses, and infuse curricula with global perspectives.Some of these efforts are showing positive trends. Students are studying abroad in record numbers. According to the most recent Open Doors data, nearly a quarter of... read more
Posted by: Caitlin Haugen
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