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September 2, 2015 | 10:02 pm
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December 3, 2014 | 9:47 am
A recording of a webinar that focused on sharing strategies for collborating and connecting through social media as a means to support internationalization of teacher preparation programs. Moderator:  Jennifer Manise, Longview FoundationPresenters:Melanie Miller Foster and Daniel Foster, College of Agricultural Sciences, the Pennsylvania State UniversityCaitlin Haugen, Global Teacher EducationContinue the Conversation...Share thoughts at our hastag #Web2SocialTPrepAnd at GTE's discussion forum (requires free registration):How do you use social media to support your internationalization goals?How do you incorporate social media into your teaching and learning?Do you know of any social media tools or resources to support global learning?...or start your own discussion around social media for internationalization.This webinar was made possible through in-kind donations from:Asia Society Partnership for Global Learning that for provides the webinar platform.Longview Foundation for World... read more
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April 28, 2014 | 12:33 am
by Robin VitucciInternational benchmarking tests for education have been around since the 1960s. Despite criticisms that the United States has fallen behind in recent years, in truth we have never been top performers. Still, these comparisons have become an increasing part of education reform efforts around the world.  The most comprehensive benchmark comes from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), an international organization dedicated to global economic development. Since 2000, the OECD has administered the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) to evaluate worldwide education systems every three years by assessing the competencies of 15-year-olds in math, reading, and science.The United States has seen average performance on these exams when compared with other OECD and partner countries. In 2000, the first year of PISA, the United States ranked 20th in math, 15th in science, and 16th in reading out of 41 countries. On the 2012 exam, the U... read more
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June 26, 2013 | 6:48 pm
Indiana University (IU) has a long history of embracing internationalization in its School of Education.  When W. W. Wright became the second dean of the college in 1946, he expressed a clear commitment to global engagement that is even more apparent today under the leadership of Dean Gerardo Gonzalez. “Globally competent pedagogy and preparing globally competent teachers through research, theory, and best practices is integral to our mission,” notes Gonzalez.  “It is the fabric of our program.”   Campus Wide Foundation of SupportAs an institution, IU is dedicated to internationalization.  The University’s core curriculum includes a six-credit hour world languages and cultures requirement, which may be fulfilled by taking courses in world cultures or languages or through an international experience – such as study abroad – for at least six weeks.  As a required element of a students’ overall course load, the requirement shows that the institution is committed to ensuring all of their... read more
Posted by: Caitlin Haugen
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June 7, 2013 | 1:07 pm
In a political and economic climate with competing priroties, administrators are often required to make a case for internationalization.  Through its Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement (CIGE), the American Council on Education provides a wealth of information on internationalizing at the campus level, including on making a case for internationalization.  The Center provides variety of resources and examples, which can guide this work in colleges of education. Internationalization is an important priority for colleges of education in the US. Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage the World, a report produced by the Council of Chief State School Officers and the Asia Society Partnership for Global Learning, argues that youth are called on “to live, compete, and collaborate in a new global scenario.” This includes “unprecedented global migration and the changing nature of neighborhoods, identities, and citizenship” and “the flattened global... read more
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February 28, 2013 | 11:55 am
Faculty and administrators often turn first to student teaching abroad when considering international experiences for pre-service teachers. Colleges of education, however, have other international options to consider for their students.  Study Abroad and Supplemental Experiences for Pre-Service TeachersTrends toward short-term spring or summer experiences are attractive options for students in tightly scheduled programs such as teacher preparation, or for students for whom extended stays away from their home campuses are not possible. Clearly, it is not possible to fully appreciate the complexities of another culture during a three- or four-week visit.  Indeed, many have questioned whether a student can have more than superficial exposure through these kinds of experiences. However, short, carefully-planned programs may spark a desire for further cross-cultural learning, lay a foundation for longer experiences, provide basic language instruction, or establish relationships that... read more
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February 18, 2013 | 8:55 am
Michigan State University is a globally minded campus and has been for a long time. The college's leadership recruit academics, students, and researchers from around the world - a practice that began over forty years ago and grown stronger over the decades. As a result of this commitment, the campus has deeply integrated international perspectives into their teacher preparation program. These perspectives manifest themselves in many ways – student experiences, faculty culture, and a global track for education majors.  The college's  Office of International Studies in Education website highlights these initiatives.Student ExperiencesMichigan State’s graduate programs require that doctoral and master’s level students go abroad to conduct research as a part of their educational experience. This stated goal of this requirement is to allow students to observe and understand other cultures in order to better understand their own. Faculty find that the experience elevates the dialogue and... read more
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February 18, 2013 | 8:53 am
According to Mary Lynne Calhoun, former Dean of the College of Education at The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, “Professors and students need a road map – a way to get started.”  A College of Education Internationalization Plan, designed and approved by the faculty, provides exactly the kind of roadmap that guides the student experience and faculty development within the college.Emphasis on Global PerspectivesUNC Charlotte has a uniquely successful approach to accomplishing its global perspectives emphasis. It begins before students ever spend a day in the teacher education program. The university requires two years of foreign language study to qualify for their teacher education program, ensuring that students have at minimum, moderate exposure to another language prior to beginning their studies.  Once students have been accepted to the college, they begin cultivating global perspectives from their earliest experiences in the program. The coursework sequence requires a... read more