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February 28, 2013 | 12:33 pm
Recruiting permanent and visiting faculty members offers the opportunity to deeply connect faculty and students to global perspectives. Whether these professionals are tenure track or visitors, potential contributions to your campus and community are significant. Leadership and committees play an important role in ensuring that an aptitude for international perspectives is an integral part of any recruitment process.Recruiting Internationally Minded FacultySeeking and hiring teacher educators who have international interests is one way to internationalize a teacher education program. Some institutions have begun to do just that. At the University of San Diego School of Leadership and Education Sciences (SOLES), candidates are asked what languages they speak and how their experiences and interests will assist the school in internationalizing the curriculum.  Other colleges of education are aligning their job descriptions with their internationalized strategic plans, thereby only... read more
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February 28, 2013 | 12:12 pm
In the absence of campus-wide internationalization efforts, advisors are a critical link.  can encourage students to choose internationally focused electives and other requirements. Advising about international options for undergraduate students is a major need in teacher education programs. In To Leave No Teacher Behind (2007), Ann Imlah Schneider found that 75% of faculty and administrators interviewed in schools, colleges, and departments of education reported that advisors are not sufficiently trained about the international options open to students.  Ninety percent of current teachers interviewed think teacher training should include advising specifically about international options.Advising students about inernational opportunities early in their undergraduate education, even during the college application process, increases the likelihood they will be able to fit them into a tight schedule. Admissions recruiters explicitly market the fact that students can fulfill their student... read more
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February 28, 2013 | 12:09 pm
​The Modern Language Association (MLA), in a report outlining strategies to improve foreign language study in higher education, argues “In the context of globalization and in the post–9/11 environment...the usefulness of studying languages other than English is no longer contested.”  In today’s multicultural communities, there are myriad benefits to increasing the number of elementary and secondary teachers able to communicate in a second language.  The school population is growing increasingly diverse. Teachers who study second languages can communicate with students and parents in languages other than English. World language study, however, also provides teachers of all subject areas with a window into other cultures. Language study is often seen as an essential component of global competence development. The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) is an association for language education professionals. In a recent press release on the association's position on... read more
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February 28, 2013 | 11:59 am
The number of students who come to today’s college campuses with experience of the world and enthusiasm to learn more is increasing. An American Council on Education report (2008) revealed that 61% of incoming students had traveled in another country with their families, and 51% have close friends or family who live in another country.  These students need to be encouraged to enter teaching.Admissions officers and other advisors play a key role in helping students with these interests and experiences to consider a teaching career. Recruiting such students into teaching could bring a greater variety of international perspectives into classrooms and P-12 schools. Sharing information about teaching careers with students taking internationally themed courses in the Arts and Sciences could entice those with this predisposition to take the classes required for teacher certification.Providing scholarship to students based on international interests sends a clear message that students with... read more
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February 28, 2013 | 10:53 am
The importance of scientific literacy to well-informed 21stcentury citizenry is paramount. Teachers who bring a global perspective to the study of science help their students understand that the field is rooted in research and discovery that dates back to ancient Greece, China, and the Islamic world.Internationally-minded science educators also help their students see that addressing many of today’s global challenges requires international scientific cooperation.  This approach creates opportunities for project based learning and collaboration between science and other disciplines. A Global Learning Scholar (GLS) at the University of Akron collaborated with a Social Studies GLS to create a unit on climate change  for her GLS project.The process of introducing global perspectives in science often happens in methods courses.  C. Bobbi Hansen teaches a course in the University of San Diego School of Leadership and Education Sciences titled “Elementary Curriculum and Methods for Global... read more
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November 26, 2012 | 12:29 pm
Courses that focus on specific content areas provide the most direct avenue for helping future teachers learn how to integrate knowledge of the world into their teaching. All subjects, not just social studies and languages, can be taught with the world in mind. Learning to do this well, to go beyond “food, flags, and festivals,” takes time, reflection, and guidance. It requires support for teacher candidates to deepen their knowledge of global issues, world regions, and cultures, and to learn new pedagogical practices they may not have experienced as students.Collaboration among faculty in education and arts and sciences can be particularly beneficial for revising instructional methods classes. Teacher educators for instructional methods courses can guide future teachers’ pedagogical practices so they can help their own students understand and engage with the world in meaningful ways. These practices include:Seeking accurate information from a variety of sources, especially primary... read more
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November 26, 2012 | 12:01 pm
There is no denying that charismatic leaders and “lighthouse” projects can have major impact in achieving goals like internationalization. These efforts, however, are often limited and short-lived, missing the chance to have lasting and deep influence in effecting organizational reform in educator preparation. Many colleges have positive initiatives that strive to implement broad goals related to internationalization, but true internationalization is systematic and requires holistic transformation of everything from curriculum to faculty and staff attitudes to funding structures.​True internationalization, according to the report Internationalizing the Campus: A User’s Guide from the American Council on Education (ACE), is not an easy or quick process – requiring one global requirement or adding international content to existing courses will not suffice.  Successful internationalization, “requires making the case to multiple stakeholders and tapping external interest… [it] is a slow,... read more